The Greatest Books Of All Time

This list is formed from the average of hundreds of ‘greatest book lists’ from across the world. An algorithm calculates the frequency in which a book is mentioned on a list and distributed a score considering its position and the weight of the source.

1. The Great Gatsby By F.Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional towns of West Egg and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby…

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2. Lolita By Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita is a 1955 novel written by Russian-American novelist Vladimir Nabokov. The novel is notable for its controversial subject: the protagonist and unreliable narrator, a middle-aged literature professor under the pseudonym Humbert Humbert, is obsessed with a 12-year-old girl…

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3. Ulysses By James Joyce

Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904.[4][5] Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer‘s epic poem the Odyssey.

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4. In Search Of Lost Time By Marcel Proust

In Search of Lost Time follows the narrator’s recollections of childhood and experiences into adulthood during late 19th century to early 20th century aristocratic France, while reflecting on the loss of time and lack of meaning to the world.[1] The novel began to take shape in 1909. Proust continued…

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5. Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell

The story takes place in an imagined future, the year 1984, when much of the world has fallen victim to perpetual waromnipresent government surveillancehistorical negationism, and propaganda. Great Britain, known as Airstrip One, has become a province of a superstate

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6. One Hundred Years Of Solitude By Gabriel García Márquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude is a landmark 1967 novel by Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that tells the multi-generational story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch, José Arcadio Buendía, founded the town of Macondo, a fictitious town in the country of Colombia.

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7. Moby-Dick By Herman Melville

The book is the sailor Ishmael’s narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that on the ship’s previous voyage bit off Ahab’s leg at the knee.

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8. War and Peace By Leo Tolstoy

The novel chronicles the French invasion of Russia and the impact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society through the stories of five Russian aristocratic families.

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9. Don Quixote By Miguel de Cervantes

Don Quixote is the most influential work of literature from the Spanish Golden Age and the entire Spanish literary canon. A founding work of Western literature, it is often labeled “the first modern novel” and many authors consider it to be the best literary work ever written.

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10. The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky

The Brothers Karamazov is a passionate philosophical novel set in 19th-century Russia, that enters deeply into the ethical debates of God, free will, and morality. It is a spiritual, theological drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, judgment, and reason, set against a modernizing Russia.

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11. To The Lighthouse By Virginia Woolf

To the Lighthouse is a 1927 novel by Virginia Woolf. The novel centres on the Ramsay family and their visits to the Isle of Skye in Scotland between 1910 and 1920. Cited as a key example of the literary technique of multiple focalization, the novel includes little dialogue and almost no action; most of it is written as thoughts and observations.

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12. Anna Karenina By Leo Tolstoy

A complex novel in eight parts, it deals with themes of betrayal, faith, family, marriage, Imperial Russian society, desire, and rural vs. city life. The plot centres on an extramarital affair between Anna and dashing cavalry officer Count Alexei Kirillovich Vronsky.

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13. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

The book is noted for its colourful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist over 20 years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism.

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14. The Catcher in the Rye By J. D. Salinger

It was originally intended for adults but is often read by adolescents for its themes of angst and alienation, and as a critique on superficiality in society. It has been translated widely. Around one million copies are sold each year, with total sales of more than 65 million books.

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15. The Sound and the Fury By William Faulkner

The Sound and the Fury is set in Jefferson, Mississippi. The novel centres on the Compson family, former Southern aristocrats who are struggling to deal with the dissolution of their family and its reputation.

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